It is currently 06 Jul 2020, 03:37


Omega 1603 FR2005A - no oscillation

For electronic related stuff like module repair, silver epoxy fixes etc.
  • Author
  • Message
Offline

chrismarseille

Member

Member

  • Posts: 18
  • Joined: 07 Feb 2014, 15:12

Omega 1603 FR2005A - no oscillation

Post04 May 2014, 12:16

Hello,
Working on a omega 1603 frontier FR2005A that refuses to oscillate :( quartz and trimmer tested ok.
This module displays no digit at all when powered and consumes quit a lot, 55 microA.
I am suspecting the "long resistance film" to be dead according the very informative article posted by bucko170 (viewtopic.php?f=64&t=5011&p=32840&hilit=Frontier+oscillator#p32840)

Before tempting this fixing, I would have liked to have your opinion. Is this normal the module does not display even a single digit ? Doesn.t that mean a dead circuit ? Has someone already tried a film resistance replacement for that module ?
Thank you for your reading.
Chris
Offline

chrismarseille

Member

Member

  • Posts: 18
  • Joined: 07 Feb 2014, 15:12

Re: Omega 1603 FR2005A - no oscillationsn

Post14 May 2014, 00:43

I answer myself partialy since I succeeded in making it work :)
so this module doesn't light up when powered, you need to push the button to see something :)
I don't know what was wrong, I tested maybe too fast the trimmer the first time...this time I desolded it, test it on capacitance meter (about 18pf), turn the brass screw to be sure it was not stuck by dust or batterie leak stains and ....miracle...now works :)
If anyone knows the normal current for this watch, I am still interested :)
Offline

Ole Joe

Geek

Geek

  • Posts: 90
  • Joined: 05 Dec 2011, 19:05
  • Location: Huntinton Beach, CA

Re: Omega 1603 FR2005A - no oscillationsn

Post14 May 2014, 05:50

chrismarseille wrote:I answer myself partialy since I succeeded in making it work :)
so this module doesn't light up when powered, you need to push the button to see something :)
I don't know what was wrong, I tested maybe too fast the trimmer the first time...this time I desolded it, test it on capacitance meter (about 18pf), turn the brass screw to be sure it was not stuck by dust or batterie leak stains and ....miracle...now works :)
If anyone knows the normal current for this watch, I am still interested :)


The Frontier specifications for that module was 3uA with no buttons pressed, no display on, only the oscillator running. Every module was checked at least twice prior to shipment. Anything over 3uA was rejected. Some rejects drawing 3-7uA were sold to "NO Name" watch manufactures at reduced prices. Anything over 7uA were trashed. Believe me, there were thousands of modules which went to the Orange County California landfills in the '70's. The trimmer were normally 5-28pf or 5-35pf in value.
Offline

chrismarseille

Member

Member

  • Posts: 18
  • Joined: 07 Feb 2014, 15:12

Re: Omega 1603 FR2005A - no oscillation

Post14 May 2014, 18:42

Hello Ole Joe and thank you for your accurate reply !
"Anything over 7uA were trashed"...personnaly I will keep mine :)
Offline

chrismarseille

Member

Member

  • Posts: 18
  • Joined: 07 Feb 2014, 15:12

Re: Omega 1603 FR2005A - no oscillation

Post31 May 2014, 16:56

i HATE MYSELF ! Circuit cracked while I was trying to place the circuit back in its plastic case ! Why do they use ceramic instead of epoxy ?! Pfff...dozens of working hours sent to trash...
Any help to find a replacement module would be appreciated :(
Offline

Ole Joe

Geek

Geek

  • Posts: 90
  • Joined: 05 Dec 2011, 19:05
  • Location: Huntinton Beach, CA

Re: Omega 1603 FR2005A - no oscillation

Post31 May 2014, 21:26

chrismarseille wrote:i HATE MYSELF ! Circuit cracked while I was trying to place the circuit back in its plastic case ! Why do they use ceramic instead of epoxy ?! Pfff...dozens of working hours sent to trash...
Any help to find a replacement module would be appreciated :(


Alumina ceramic substrates were used due to the two thick film resistors used in the oscillator circuit of the 2005. The resistors were printed onto the substrate and then fired at about 850 degrees centigrade to get the glass like filler to flow and seal the resistors. Normal epoxy-glass boards could not withstand that type of temperature. Toward the end of life for the LED type displays and into the LCD circuits, the resistors required in the oscillator circuit were integrated into the main integrated circuit. Incorporating them into the IC required no firing at temperature and allowed the use of standard printed circuit boards.
Offline

chrismarseille

Member

Member

  • Posts: 18
  • Joined: 07 Feb 2014, 15:12

Re: Omega 1603 FR2005A - no oscillation

Post31 May 2014, 22:13

Hi Ole Joe,
Thank you for your reply. i guessed they had very good reason to use ceramic, I know now exactly why :) but I hate them :)
Do you know if this module is hard to find ? It seems the hamiltons use this module from 1977. Do you know other (cheaper) brands which used this module too ?
Offline

Ole Joe

Geek

Geek

  • Posts: 90
  • Joined: 05 Dec 2011, 19:05
  • Location: Huntinton Beach, CA

Re: Omega 1603 FR2005A - no oscillation

Post31 May 2014, 23:02

chrismarseille wrote:Hi Ole Joe,
Thank you for your reply. i guessed they had very good reason to use ceramic, I know now exactly why :) but I hate them :)
Do you know if this module is hard to find ? It seems the hamiltons use this module from 1977. Do you know other (cheaper) brands which used this module too ?


Frontier sold the 2005 modules by the truckloads, finding one that works after 40 years might prove to be a bit of a challenge. I can only recall the names of a few watch companies we sold them to; Hudson-Harris, Mercury Time, Gillette and Hamilton. I'm sure that some of the members of DWF who collect and deal in LED watches will be able to help you find one. Best of luck in your hunt, sorry I can't provide anymore information to you.

Return to Electronical

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 4 guests